"Treasures Of Aloha" By Keoki Kahumoku & Herb Ohta, Jr.

Keoki Kahumoku & Herb Ohta, Jr.
“Treasures Of Aloha”
Roy Sakuma Prod. (RSCD 9820)
$13.00

2002 Hawai‘i Music Awards Nominee
(Instrumental Album of the Year)

Stacks Image 116400

$13.00

NOTE: DIGITAL MP3ʻS CAN ONLY BE DOWNLOADED TO YOUR PERSONAL COMPUTER. IT WILL NOT DOWNLOAD ONTO A MOBILE DEVICE.

00:00
00:00
  1. 01 ʻAma ʻAma
  2. 02 Lei Nani
  3. 03 Kaimana Hila
  4. 04 I'll Remember You
  5. 05 Hale ʻOlu
  6. 06 Kou Aloha Mau A Mau
  7. 07 Mauna Loa
  8. 08 Mohala
  9. 09 Glass Ball Slack-Key
  10. 10 E Kuʻu Morning Dew
  11. 11 ʻUlupalakua
  12. 12 Aloha ʻOe

Your web browser does not support HTML5 audio. Please update to a newer web browser.

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER: Roy Sakuma Productions, Inc.
PRODUCER(S): Herb Ohta, Jr., Keoki Kahumoku, Charley Lukela
ENGINEERING & MIX: Charley Lukela

GUEST MUSICIANS:
Ocean Kaowili: Bass

The Honolulu Advertiser
Sunday June 28, 2002

Review By Wayne Harada

Stacks Image 116416
Genre: Contemporary and traditional Hawaiian.

Distinguishing notes:
Two next-generation artists team up again with the mutual mission of sharing and showcasing songs they have learned for future generations to enjoy. Kahumoku's father is a master at ki ho'alu, storytelling and singing, and the senior Ohta also is a pioneer in his 'ukulele craftsmanship, so this sons-of-the-'aina collaboration is a feel-good keepsake.

The outlook:
Kahumoku is an expressive performer, using voice to parlay emotions that go well beyond the written words. "I'll Remember You," a Kui Lee composition, typifies his ability to take the familiar and reap new insights. His father George Kahumoku Jr.'s original, "Hale 'Olu," is a sweet, country-road remembrance. Ohta mostly lets his fingers do the talking, though he occasionally vocalizes, and you can hear the hustle on instrumentals such as "Glass Ball Slack Key" and "Kaimana Hila." The songs are the duo's personal favorites from the distant and near past, revived because they have something to say for current and future listeners.

Our take:
An enterprising franchise is the works — the "Other Sons of Hawai'i," maybe?