"'Ukulele Dream" By Herb Ohta, Jr.

Herb Ohta, Jr.
“‘Ukulele Dream”

Roy Sakuma Prod. (RSCD 8801)
(THIRD SOLO RECORDING)

2001 Na Hoku Hanohano Awards Nominee:
(Best Instrumental of the Year)

2001 Hawai’i Music Awards Winner:
(Best Instrumental of the Year)

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$14.00

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER: Roy Sakuma Productions, Inc.
PRODUCER(S): Herb Ohta, Jr. & Charley Lukela
ENGINEERING & MIX: Charley Lukela

GUEST MUSICIANS:
Kimo Bell: Bass
Dwight Kanae: Guitar
Jon Porlas: Percussions
Michael Guerrero: Keyboards / String Arrangements
Gregg Sardinha: Steel Guitar
Ernie Cruz, Jr.: Guitar
Bryan Tolentino
: 'Ukulele

The Honolulu Advertiser
Saturday July 7, 2001

Review By Wayne Harada

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Like Father, like son, Herb Ohta, Jr. is the son of Ohta-San. He has listened well, being surrounded by music, and has distinguished himself as a leading next-generation solo artist

This collection includes originals (Junior has composed “Kaanapali Sunset”) but the oldies or familiar melodies constitute the bulk of the fare.
He strums and plucks and has a merry time with the likes of “Lahainaluna,” “White Sandy Beach,” “Paniolo Country,” and “Kamalani.”

There are a few non-Hawaiian entities that suit the ‘ukulele treatment: “If We Hold On Together,” “Tico Tico,” a sampling of Latin moods; and “G Minor Fleas” (a duet with Bryan Tolentino), with its classical bent.

There’s something quite magical and relaxing about the evocative tones of a trusty ‘ukulele, and Junior has become a master in his own right.

The Star Bulletin
Friday July 13, 2001

Island Mele
Review By John Berger

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Yes, Herb Ohta Jr., is Ohta-san's son, but the young virtuoso's third album ties into a broader and more complicated musical relationship. Ohta Jr. is also related by marriage to famed ukulele instructor Roy Sakuma, who not only is the executive producer of the album but also got his start as Ohta-san's student and protégé. "Ukulele Dream" thus completes a circle while exploring new musical formulas.

Ohta, Sakuma, and co-producer Charley Lukela use an all-star band to expand the arrangements. Go straight to "Kaanapali Sunset" to hear Ohta work solo, or check out his duet with fellow ukulele player Bryan Tolentino, "G Minor Fleas," and compare it with their way they did it on Ohta's first album in 1997.

"Tropical Baby," "Ku'u Ipo I Ka He'e Pu'e One" and "Tico Tico (Tico No Fuba)" add diversity of tempo and texture while neatly displaying Ohta's technical abilities. This album will appeal both to uke fans and folks who just want some beautiful instrumental music.